Author Topic: John Houbolt, champion of LOR, dies  (Read 5545 times)

Offline Obviousman

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John Houbolt, champion of LOR, dies
« on: April 20, 2014, 03:43:16 AM »
Very sad news:

http://www.nasa.gov/content/john-c-houbolt-unsung-hero-of-the-apollo-program-dies-at-age-95/

"Somewhat as a voice in the wilderness....."

The world is now poorer for the loss of that voice.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2014, 03:45:05 AM by Obviousman »

Offline Luke Pemberton

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Re: John Houbolt, champion of LOR, dies
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2014, 05:05:53 AM »
His story featured in 'From Earth to the Moon.'

Incredible story. Would Apollo have succeeded without his 'unorthodox' intervention?
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former - Albert Einstein.

I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people – Sir Isaac Newton.

A polar orbit would also bypass the SAA - Tim Finch

Offline AtomicDog

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Re: John Houbolt, champion of LOR, dies
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2014, 04:30:52 PM »
"Spider" is one of my favorite FTETTM episodes. Think I'll watch it tonight.
"There is no belief, however foolish, that will not gather its faithful adherents who will defend it to the death." - Isaac Asimov

Offline Luke Pemberton

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Re: John Houbolt, champion of LOR, dies
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2014, 07:07:04 PM »
"Spider" is one of my favorite FTETTM episodes. Think I'll watch it tonight.

Have to say, I enjoyed the pre-landing episodes the most. They gave a little of the essence and spirit of Apollo and how it must have felt to be involved with the program. It must be every engineers' dream to build a time machine so they can go back and work on Apollo. I also thought they dealt with the Apollo 1 accident in a very thoughtful manner.

One of many reasons I enjoyed Apollo 13 was the feel it gave when watching. Again, while I can't really imagine how the astronauts and engineers must have felt, it certainly gave some idea of the pressing time demands when life and death problems needed solving. How much was scripted to suit Hollywood, I don't know. I guess there was some poetic licence in many places.
Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former - Albert Einstein.

I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people – Sir Isaac Newton.

A polar orbit would also bypass the SAA - Tim Finch